Events

Events

The Mast Cell-Neuron Axis: Implications for Future Skin and Itch Therapies

Nov 09, 2021

The Mast Cell-Neuron Axis: Implications for Future Skin and Itch Therapies

Event time and date

11/09/2021
11:00 am - 12:30 pm



Event Details

REGISTER HERE

Join us at the Dermatology Innovation Symposium and learn how recent fundamental advances in neuroimmunology and mast cell biology may provide a new future paradigm for drug discovery and development.

Program (EDT)

11:00AM – Welcome and introduction

Brian S. Kim, MD, MTR, FAAD Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine; Co-Director, Center for the Study of Itch & Sensory Disorders, Washington University School of Medicine

11:05AM – The sweet story of biologically active IgE

Michelle E. Conroy, MD Instructor of Medicine Harvard University; Attending in Allergy and Immunology, Massachusetts General Hospital

11:35AM – Heterogeneity and function of MrgprB2/X2+ mast cells in vivo – New perspectives for drug development

Nicolas Gaudenzio, PhD Principal Investigator, Inserm

12:05PM – The contribution of a mast cell receptor to itch and pain

Xinzhong Dong, PhD Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

12:35PM – Roundtable discussion (invitation only)

Speakers

Brian S. Kim, MD, MTR, FAAD
Associate Professor of Medicine Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine & Co-Director, Center for the Study of Itch & Sensory Disorders, Washington University School of Medicine

Read more about Brian S. Kim

Dr. Kim is Co-Director for the Center for the Study of Itch and Sensory Disorders (CSISD) and Associate Professor of Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Key discoveries from his laboratory include the first identification of group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) in the skin of both mice and humans and their role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) or eczema. Most recently, he has discovered how the immune system directly regulates sensory neurons to modulate the sensation of itch and how natural killer (NK) cells may be used as an immunotherapy strategy for AD. These studies have revealed novel therapeutic strategies which have led to successful clinical trials for new drugs for AD. He has multiple patents pending that led to the formation of Nuogen Pharma, Inc. that is developing JAK inhibitors for chronic pruritus. Dr. Kim’s research on innate immunity and neuroimmune regulation of AD and itch has led to awards and funding from the National Institutes of Health, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, American Skin Association, American Academy of Dermatology, American Society for Clinical Investigation, American Dermatological Association, and the International League of Dermatology Societies.

Michelle E. Conroy, MD
Instructor of Medicine Harvard University; Attending in Allergy and Immunology, Massachusetts General Hospital

Read more about Michelle E. Conroy

Dr. Conroy in an Instructor of Medicine at Harvard University, attending physician in Allergy and Immunology and a member of the Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital. Her research focuses on glycosylation as it relates to regulation of antibody function. Specifically, her work uncovered a previously dismissed role for glycosylation in determination of pathogenesis of IgE antibodies in the context of allergic inflammation. This novel finding provides an entirely new dimension to understand regulation of IgE function. Clinical relevance of this finding is widespread as IgE is implicated in not only atopic diseases, but autoimmunity and cancer.

Nicolas Gaudenzio, PhD
Principal Investigator, Inserm

Read more about Nicolas Gaudenzio

Dr. Gaudenzio is a Principal Investigator at Inserm and University of Toulouse in the field of neuro-immunology and allergic inflammation. After a productive experience as a Postdoctoral fellow (with more than 22 published articles between 2013 and 2017) in the Department of Pathology at Stanford University, he has created a cross-disciplinary research lab back in France with a label from the European Research Council (ERC) since 2018. His work has contributed substantially to identify molecular and cellular targets involved in allergic and non-allergic skin inflammation and to develop new imaging methods to probe neuro-immune interactions in preclinical skin models.

Xinzhong Dong, PhD
Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Read more about Xinzhong Dong

Xinzhong Dong completed the Ph.D. program in the Department of Biological Chemistry at UCLA and received his postdoc training at Caltech. He started his own lab at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2004 and has made pioneer discoveries on understanding itch and pain mechanisms as well as innate immunity by characterizing the Mrgpr family. His lab has also generated various genetic tools for classification and functional characterization of nociceptors. He has trained many successful young scientists. In his time at Hopkins he has quickly risen to the rank of Professor in recognition of his teaching, mentorship, and research.


Menu